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Well, the sad reality of what can happen to this breed has shown up again --

 

A trusted rescuer writes --

"A recent drug bust found pit pups and several adults. The pups are 6-8 weeks old. Two different litters. A deaf dog rescue will take two pups leaving eight pups needing rescue. Dog fighters are coming out of nowhere claiming these pits. They are just showing up at homes of rescuers that they think might have them."


"Some of my rescue friends are scared at what these people might do to them."

This is a sad story on so many levels -- the look in the mother's eye -- that she has all but given up. Also, the innocence of the pit puppies, who were born in to the wrong situation.

I am fostering a litter now, which will shortly be placed. Whenever I spend time with these babies, they always remind me how innocent and fragile they are -- an innocence that pushes me to work harder in finding them outstanding homes, forever.


For each adoption candidate, I go through numerous back-and-forth emails reviewing their application, and I also check their references, usually their vet. If the application is satisfactory, I invite the potential adopters to a puppy meet-and-greet -- oftentimes a puppy party for babies, or a 1-on-1 for adults. Here, I get to interact with the adopters, and they get to see what a large commitment they're making.

After that, each side has a few days to think of their upcoming decision. Finally, I visit the home of each adopter, and they agree to a detailed adoption contract, which is very biased towards the dog's best interests. If the family doesn't agree with the contract or if I am not comfortable with the home, we simply look towards the next one. I am not doing this as a feel-good exercise, or to see how many friends I can make. I view my role as the final link for this pup's life, and I am going to do all I can to place them in the best homes possible.


This story is a sad reality of what can happen when this breed gets in the wrong hands.

I have been told many times by some very smart people, "This isn't reality, what you're doing. You're wasting your time -- you're not making a difference -- why don't you do this more on an broader, more administrative role, instead of on a dog-by-dog basis?"


Well, to me, this is reality. These dogs need help, and from the pleas for help that are sent out and that come back empty, there is a great demand to help these orhpaned puppies and adults, on a dog-by-dog basis. For me, leaving a home-visit and deciding to adopt to a family is one of the most rewarding feelings -- this dog's life will be happy and secure. This isn't some Pet-Smart adopt-a-thon in the parking lot, it is instead a carefully planned process.

That is my reality, and the steps I take to get there are worthy, in my eyes and in my foster dog's eyes! One of the best follow-up emails I get is when someone cc's me on a message to their friends, saying "Look at the pup I just rescued -- I love her!!" -- these dogs are rescued, not bought, and the adopters are now advocates of a larger group which tries so hard to help, not hurt, this great breed.